Author Topic: Lactose in an IPA?  (Read 563 times)

Beechlawn Brewing

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Re: Lactose in an IPA?
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2019, 12:25:08 PM »
is the 1.056 inclusive of the lactose addition, and the 1.024 finishing also inclusive of it?

Lactose is not fermentable, but does contribute to the OG and FG as it's a sugar.

What kind of OG were you expecting to get from a grain bill that's 30% flaked wheat and oats, if it was 1.056 with 600g of lactose added, then it seems ok to me?
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JDC

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Re: Lactose in an IPA?
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2019, 01:23:04 PM »
is the 1.056 inclusive of the lactose addition, and the 1.024 finishing also inclusive of it?

Lactose is not fermentable, but does contribute to the OG and FG as it's a sugar.

What kind of OG were you expecting to get from a grain bill that's 30% flaked wheat and oats, if it was 1.056 with 600g of lactose added, then it seems ok to me?

Hi Beechlawn,

Yep, the gravity readings are inclusive of the lactose.  The OG is bang on what I was expecting, but I've never had a beer finish as high as 1.024 (think 1.018 was my previous highest - also a beer with lactose), so was just wondering if it was the lactose, the yeast, or a combination of both which caused this.

From what I gather from the comments, the MJ M44 (and MJ yeasts in general) finish high due to low cell count, and the figures add up.  Delighted to get the feedback as I've learned a few things from this brew thanks to the comments here.
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