• Welcome to National Homebrew Club Ireland. Please login or sign up.
February 26, 2021, 06:01:19 PM

News:

Renewing ? Its fast and easy - just pay here
Not a forum user? Now you can join the discussion on Discord


How to make your own BIAB

Started by bionut, October 14, 2013, 05:14:36 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

bionut

October 14, 2013, 05:14:36 PM Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 08:20:48 PM by Il Tubo
Hi guys!
New on the forum.
A even cheaper solution is to make yourself a bag. I made a spreadsheet after the formulas of a biabrewer member that is very useful.
The second spreadsheet is for a simpler bag, not a fustrum one.

Eoin

Quote from: bionut on October 14, 2013, 05:14:36 PM
Hi guys!
New on the forum.
A even cheaper solution is to make yourself a bag. I made a spreadsheet after the formulas of a biabrewer member that is very useful.
The second spreadsheet is for a simpler bag, not a fustrum one.

Not everyone, in fact most won't have, an overlocker or the necessary skills. But yeah nothing wrong with making your own.

Sent using a complex system of semaphore and ninjas.


bionut

You don't need an overlocker to do it. A regular double stitch will work. Mine was sewed by hand, so you don't even need a sewing machine :D
If you do not have the money to buy a custom one you can make it fairly easy.

Garry

Welcome to the forum bionut.

Cool spreadsheets, thanks for sharing. You can't beat geometry and excel :P

What material do you need to make one of these bags? And do you need special thread?

Eoin

Use Swiss voile curtain material and nylon thread. Natural fibres will rot.

Sent using a complex system of semaphore and ninjas.


brenmurph

so long as ye appreciate the potential weight of  the grain bag after mashing 6-10 kg of grain...pretty difficult to lift.......like lead ;)

Garry

Thanks Eoin :))

The ones on your website look the berries btw O0

Eoin

The wet weight of my own brew bag is about 25kg. They really need to be strong. I've tested our seams and was unable to tear them apart by hand, this is where an overlocker is preferable. It's a dangerous business drawing a wet bag at 65c. The massive pressures come from twisting the bag to squeeze it, but this is an essential element of BIAB if you ask me. I had one of the early bags fail in this phase once, then changed to the looped design to take the pressure. It was actually a drawstring that failed because of twisting, none of the seams failed. If you're doing your own and your grain bill is over ten kg,  be very careful.

Sent using a complex system of semaphore and ninjas.


bionut

Thanks for the kind welcome :)
Yes you need swiss voile (simple voile, white) and polyester thread. Can't be simpler than that. I will post some pictures of my hand sewed bag in a few days.

Eoin

Quote from: bionut on October 14, 2013, 08:38:33 PM
Thanks for the kind welcome :)
Yes you need swiss voile (simple voile, white) and polyester thread. Can't be simpler than that. I will post some pictures of my hand sewed bag in a few days.


Do you twist your bag to squeeze it out? If so, how do you do it safely? My process still needs some type of hoist to lift my bag safely.

Sent using a complex system of semaphore and ninjas.


bionut

Quote from: Eoin on October 14, 2013, 08:36:37 PM
The wet weight of my own brew bag is about 25kg. They really need to be strong. I've tested our seams and was unable to tear them apart by hand, this is where an overlocker is preferable. It's a dangerous business drawing a wet bag at 65c. The massive pressures come from twisting the bag to squeeze it, but this is an essential element of BIAB if you ask me. I had one of the early bags fail in this phase once, then changed to the looped design to take the pressure. It was actually a drawstring that failed because of twisting, none of the seams failed. If you're doing your own and your grain bill is over ten kg,  be very careful.

TT
Sounds that i need to find a taylor to make my bag stronger  :) until then i will work with what i have...

bionut

Quote from: Eoin on October 14, 2013, 08:41:58 PM
Quote from: bionut on October 14, 2013, 08:38:33 PM
Thanks for the kind welcome :)
Yes you need swiss voile (simple voile, white) and polyester thread. Can't be simpler than that. I will post some pictures of my hand sewed bag in a few days.


Do you twist your bag to squeeze it out? If so, how do you do it safely? My process still needs some type of hoist to lift my bag safely.

TT

You can squeeze it in a bucket and then pour the squeezed wort back in the kettle ;) I forggot to mention that my bag is hand stiched 3 times, so is strong enough... i will try to stitch it the right way though...

Eoin

Quote from: bionut on October 14, 2013, 08:45:20 PM
Quote from: Eoin on October 14, 2013, 08:41:58 PM
Quote from: bionut on October 14, 2013, 08:38:33 PM
Thanks for the kind welcome :)
Yes you need swiss voile (simple voile, white) and polyester thread. Can't be simpler than that. I will post some pictures of my hand sewed bag in a few days.


Do you twist your bag to squeeze it out? If so, how do you do it safely? My process still needs some type of hoist to lift my bag safely.

TT

You can squeeze it in a bucket and then pour the squeezed wort back in the kettle ;) I forggot to mention that my bag is hand stiched 3 times, so is strong enough... i will try to stitch it the right way though...


Not knocking it man, in the spirit of homebrew we're DIY types :-)

I'm just trying to pass on my experience with the materials and their tolerances.

Sent using a complex system of semaphore and ninjas.


bionut

Ooo, i have to mention also that i am a newbie brewer, so i don't use a lot of malt for a 20 L beer. Next time i will weight the wet bag to see how much it holds.

Garry

Quote from: Eoin on October 14, 2013, 08:36:37 PM
The wet weight of my own brew bag is about 25kg.

25kg  :o I've got a heap of old coal bags, would they do  :P