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Elderflower Champagne Recipes?

Started by KDeath, May 17, 2018, 11:01:09 AM

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KDeath

Gonna give this a go this year but can't find a definitive recipe online - this is what I've put together so far:

10L batch
40 elderflower heads, no stems
2kg sugar
Juice & zest of 4 lemons

In terms of ingredients there seems to be a bit of variety in terms of adding vinegar, citric acid, grape juice, etc. Is additional citric acid required if I add lemon juice? Not entirely sure of the purpose of the vinegar, I've also seen recipes including tea or sultanas for tannins - not sure if these are needed?

In terms of process, I've seen some that don't treat the heads at all, others where the sugar & water is mixed to make a syrup then poured over the heads to kill any wild yeasts. What would be the best method there?

I've seen some recipes where you bottle before it's finished which sounds like a recipe for bottle bombs - going to ferment to dryness then prime at about 10g/L for around 3.3 volumes of CO2, bottling in champagne/prosecco bottles.

Any feedback or advice is appreciated!

Chymist

Literally just thinking about this today as well! Will be keeping an eye out here for any advice!

LordEoin

leave the flowers! They turn into berries, which make the best hedgerow wine in the whole entire universe! literally....

Yenren

Hi,
Here is a good recipe to work off, http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/reques43.asp
Citric acid is not at all but if you add a Lemon it is equivalent to about a teaspone of citric acid. If you are a beginner just follow the recipe above. Do not add vinegar, EVER! Unless you want to make vinegar.  Tea and raisins are not necessary but tea will add tannins and raisins will add body and flavour, I would add 500g raisins for 10 liters I don't use tea much but if you want to add it follow recipe.
Yep pouring boiling sugar water over the flowers is a good idea. Wait until it's about 20C before you pitch your yeast.
Yea I would ferment dry and and add sugar to carbonate here is a good calculator
https://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/

If you want to kick your wine making into high gear look up goferm yeast rehydration, and TOSNA (tailored organic stagnated nutrient addition)
If you are not bothered then the nutrient you plan to use split it into 4 additions one when you make up the must one when it starts fermenting one 24hours later and the last one when 1/3 of the sugar has been eaten of on day 7 which ever comes first.  But most importantly whip the crap out of your must twice a day for 5 min each time. Yeast need O2 to reproduce. This is all very recent wine making techniques and won't be found in old recipes.
Anyway if yo7 need more help give a shout



Quote from: KDeath on May 17, 2018, 11:01:09 AM
Gonna give this a go this year but can't find a definitive recipe online - this is what I've put together so far:

10L batch
40 elderflower heads, no stems
2kg sugar
Juice & zest of 4 lemons

In terms of ingredients there seems to be a bit of variety in terms of adding vinegar, citric acid, grape juice, etc. Is additional citric acid required if I add lemon juice? Not entirely sure of the purpose of the vinegar, I've also seen recipes including tea or sultanas for tannins - not sure if these are needed?

In terms of process, I've seen some that don't treat the heads at all, others where the sugar & water is mixed to make a syrup then poured over the heads to kill any wild yeasts. What would be the best method there?

I've seen some recipes where you bottle before it's finished which sounds like a recipe for bottle bombs - going to ferment to dryness then prime at about 10g/L for around 3.3 volumes of CO2, bottling in champagne/prosecco bottles.

Any feedback or advice is appreciated!

KDeath

That's great, cheers!

I see there's two recipes on there, one looks to halve the elderflower content and add grape juice - which would be better?

I see go-ferm and fermaid-o can be got on Amazon so I might take a look at those alright - assume the same principle applies regardless of your yeast (will be using champagne yeast)?

I have a wine whip, I'm guessing I should actively try to cause a vortex to oxygenate if I'm using it?

Yenren

For goferm and Fermaid O send these guys an email https://www.litmuswines.com they sell it in 1kg and 2kg bags. It's well worth it and they keeps. The type of yeast dose matter to how much Fermaid O you will use you need to find out what kind of nitrogen needs the yeast has it will be either low medium or high. You will find that on the yeast manufacturer website. Then you can put that into a tosna calculator and it will give you the amount. I use almost exclusively Lalvine yeast there the same crowd who make goferm and the have lots of info on there yeast.
As for grape juice and elderflower amount. The grape juice can be swapped with raisins. For amount of flowers I'd go on the higher side. And see how you like it. You can always make another one if you don't like the amount.
A wine whip is the only job well except for pure O2.