• Welcome to National Homebrew Club Ireland. Please login or sign up.
June 16, 2024, 07:45:35 PM

News:

Renewing ? Its fast and easy - just pay here
Not a forum user? Now you can join the discussion on Discord


Cold water steeping

Started by Dunkel, August 05, 2013, 07:43:50 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

Dunkel

I was just browsing the Cooper's website ( http://www.coopers.com.au/the-brewers-guild/how-to-brew/featured-recipes/mister-sinister ) when I came across the following:-

"The instructions detail a cold steeping method for the Roasted Barley. This technique can reduce the handling of hot ingredients whilst potentially drawing less tannin from the grain husks.

The day before: Line a pot (at least 4 litres) with a mesh cleaning cloth (pulled straight from the pack), then add the cracked grain and 2 litres of cold water. Fit the lid and sit in the fridge for 24hrs.

Remove from the fridge then gather up the corners of the mesh cloth and lift, allowing the liquid to drain from the grains back into the pot.

Place the strained liquid onto the stovetop, bring to the boil then remove from the heat. Cool the liquid by placing pot in a bath of cold water for about 15mins."

Anyone come across this method before?

LordEoin

Yeah, it works fine for any grains that dont have enzymes, so don't need any heat to get the goodies out.
Carapils, biscuit, chocolate, crystal, etc are all fine in a cold steep.
You don't even need the cloth. It works fine to just steep the cracked grain in a pot or bowl overnight (fridge is optional), then stick it through a seive.

I'v never noticed any real taste difference over doing a warm steep. I generally steep in a muslin bag at about 60-70, dunking like a teabag, for about 15-20 minutes.
Just don't squeeze the bag and you'll be fine from extra tannin.

newToBrew

Yeah I've done something like that before - steeped roast barley and choc malt over night, didnt do fridge thing or bag thing- used a sieve- did a 10 gallon brew - split into 2 5 gals - got a stout and pa out of it
coz theres always something new to do

DEMPSEY

I think if you want to do something like a black lager steeping the roast malts means you get the colour but not the harsher flavours from the malt.
Dei miscendarum discipulus
Forgive us our Hangovers as we forgive those who hangover against us

newToBrew

Yeah now that you mention it I think I had to use twice the normal mash amount - to get the flavour I think it avoided the harshness but tbh - I did it to get  2 different beers from the one
Mash
coz theres always something new to do

SlugTrap

Quote from: DEMPSEY on August 06, 2013, 07:43:14 PM
I think if you want to do something like a black lager steeping the roast malts means you get the colour but not the harsher flavours from the malt.

+1.

This is the reason for this method, for styles such as Black IPAs.

However, if you want color but not roasty bite, some people find it easier to just go with a dehusked malt like Carafa III.