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South Central Barrel Recipe?

Started by CARA, April 21, 2014, 09:14:05 PM

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CARA

One of the original Northern sourced barrels is still under my watchful eye and wet as ya like. Myself and Damien have briefly discussed ideas so why don't we get some down here.
Upa Sesh

Dodge

What you looking at? Wouldn't mind joining the wagon of brewing ;D

CARA

Well we were talking about the stouts and porters of the late 1800/early 1900 era and then shared a bottle of Kernels Imperial Brown Porter which pretty much summed up our chat perfectly.
Would love to do something bretty also though.
Upa Sesh

Kellie

Me and Mashtun will be in for the brown porter, if thats what you decide to go for........sounds yummy :)

Damien M

I had me a bottle of Odell 90 Shilling at the weekend and it might go well with a light whiskey and oaking, then had a bottle of Kinnegar Rustbucket Rye Ale and the rye could well support the Oak and Whiskey how about a 90 Ryeale a Shilling Rye hybrid? A few trials may have to be done to get the ratios right but   it might work? :-\

Dodge

Really Anything that has that maltiness will work with the oak and whiskey.

One issue with regards to the barrel comp remarks is that when you look at the various examples of commercial beer done in whiskey barrels and the experts out there, one thing is generally said which is that you want to end up with a beer first that has slight whiskey and oak notes to complement the beer than a whiskey with beer notes.

That is why the abv is generally higher to allow the rich maltiness to stand out more. Again there are exceptions.

you could try the beer style you like and add a little whiskey into it to see if it complements it?

Damien M

Thanks for your insight Dodge!  I do think a few testers will be needed to get the right beer to suit the oak and whisky.