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Lallemand sour yeast

Started by mick02, September 14, 2019, 04:43:59 pm

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mick02

I was just reading about a new yeast developed by Lallemand that produces lactic acid as a by product of fermentation. This allows brewers to create sour beers through the normal fermentation process. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/sourvisiae/
NHC Secretary

Hingo

Is it a "wild" yeast then? Eg is it just a lactobacillus saccharomyces blend, or does it do something to produce lactic flavours "through the normal fermentation process" (assuming they mean like "clean" fermentation brews?)

mick02

Here is the official blurb

QuoteSourvisiae® is a bioengineered ale yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) capable of producing lactic acid during fermentation to provide brewers with an easy, reproducible, and mono-culture product for sour-style beer production.

Sourvisiae® contains a single genetic modification, a lactate dehydrogenase gene from a food microorganism, which enables the yeast to produce high levels of lactic acid, the main compound that gives sour beers their flavor. Sourvisiae® allows the brewer to ferment and sour the beer in one simple step, reducing cross-contamination risks, lowering costs, cutting total process time, and allowing brewers to obtain a consistent product. The brewing process is conducted without any modifications; Sourvisiae® is pitched just like conventional yeast and ferments in a normal fermentation time. Sourvisiae® does not produce other flavor compounds associated with Brettanomyces, Lachancea, or Lactic Acid Bacteria, providing a cleaner and more reproducible souring process, with much shorter fermentation times.
NHC Secretary

Jonnycheech

Sounds interesting, but i'm sceptical. Some one try it and report back, i don't want to be the first  :D

I wonder if you can tweak the amount of sourness produced by ageing or temp, or is it stable in the level it produces...
Tapped: FES, NEIPA, CocoIMS, Flanders 2018, Passion Fruit/Peach BW
Fermentors: Raspberry Wheat, Session IPA
Bottled: Cherry Lambic 2019

mick02

Quote from: Jonnycheech on September 18, 2019, 05:46:51 am
Sounds interesting, but i'm sceptical. Some one try it and report back, i don't want to be the first  :D

I wonder if you can tweak the amount of sourness produced by ageing or temp, or is it stable in the level it produces...

From what I read it produces quite a lot of lactic and it's is extremely hard to control the amount of sourness that it produces.
NHC Secretary

Water_Wolf

QuoteSourvisiae® does not produce other flavor compounds associated with Brettanomyces, Lachancea, or Lactic Acid Bacteria


If that is the case, I don't see any advantage over just brewing with a normal yeast and adding in purified lactic acid. You'd have much more control over the amount of sourness that way.

nigel_c

Could be added at a point where the gravity has dropped say about half way. Limiting the remaining sugars would limit the available food for the lacto producing yeast.