• Welcome to National Homebrew Club Ireland. Please login or sign up.
February 24, 2020, 06:37:27 pm

News:

Want to Join up ? Simply follow the instructions here


Pitching yeast after 12 hours

Started by banjobrew, February 24, 2016, 10:07:27 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

banjobrew

Taking the brew day for granted I forgot to pitch the yeast after the wort had cooled. I can't believe what an eejit I am! If I pitch now... After it's been sitting over 12 hours, will it still be okay or have I wasted time and money? I've heard some people leave it overnight for their wort to cool before pitching with no bother. Has anyone experienced this?
Belfast Homebrewers.

irish_goat

It should be fine. Australians use the no-chill method a lot because of the amount of water the chiller uses. I've pitched yeast after 24 hours (first pack didn't start) and the beer came out fine.

Will_D

Pitch away it will fine!

12 hours is nothing.

Reminds me of a new to me 5 gallon wine kit: Pitched and after 2 days nowt. Then realised that THIS kit had separate Yeast and Nutrients packs and all I had pitched was the nutrient! [most wine kits they are in one bag!]

No problem!
Remember: The Nationals are just round the corner - time to get brewing

banjobrew

Sweet. I thought as much but it's always nice to hear it from others!
Belfast Homebrewers.

Leann ull

Not Ideal but you'll get away with it

cruiscinlan

Quote from: CH on February 25, 2016, 07:51:27 am
Not Ideal but you'll get away with it


Does it make that much of a difference?  I always pour hte hot wort into the fermentor, hit the hay and pitch yeast the next day.

Pheeel

Quote from: cruiscinlan on February 25, 2016, 10:42:36 am
Does it make that much of a difference?  I always pour hte hot wort into the fermentor, hit the hay and pitch yeast the next day.


It can. Pulling from t'internet

There are two real problems with slow wort chilling. One is the risk of microbiological contamination. The other problem associated with slow wort cooling is DMS formation after wort boiling. The precursor for DMS, S-methyl-methionine, decomposes when heated and becomes DMS (DMS smells like cooked corn and most brewers consider it a defect in almost all beer types). Although much of this compound is transformed to DMS and removed with steam vapor during wort boiling, some does remain. This means that the wort DMS concentration increases after boiling and prior to cooling, and is especially noticeable if wort is in a sealed container that prevents the volatile DMS to escape.

But the chance of getting an infection in 12hrs is probably not worth worrying about

No chill is different as they put it in a plastic jerry can type continaer with little to no oxygen in it
Issues with your membership? PM me!

banjobrew

Quote from: Pheeel on February 25, 2016, 01:49:10 pm
Quote from: cruiscinlan on February 25, 2016, 10:42:36 am
Does it make that much of a difference?  I always pour hte hot wort into the fermentor, hit the hay and pitch yeast the next day.


It can. Pulling from t'internet

There are two real problems with slow wort chilling. One is the risk of microbiological contamination. The other problem associated with slow wort cooling is DMS formation after wort boiling. The precursor for DMS, S-methyl-methionine, decomposes when heated and becomes DMS (DMS smells like cooked corn and most brewers consider it a defect in almost all beer types). Although much of this compound is transformed to DMS and removed with steam vapor during wort boiling, some does remain. This means that the wort DMS concentration increases after boiling and prior to cooling, and is especially noticeable if wort is in a sealed container that prevents the volatile DMS to escape.

But the chance of getting an infection in 12hrs is probably not worth worrying about

No chill is different as they put it in a plastic jerry can type continaer with little to no oxygen in it


I cooked down to pitching temp before transferring to the FV so I should be okay. We'll see.
Belfast Homebrewers.