Author Topic: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)  (Read 889 times)

cruiscinlan

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Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« on: August 29, 2016, 07:18:46 PM »
Going back over the recipes here as well as some on other sites, there's a fair bit of discussion on Belgian yeast strains for high gravity worts. However there's not much on the use of Irish/English strains for styles like barleywines, 120-/ ales, russian imperial stouts etc.

Have any of you gone beyond US-05 when making these styles?


nigel_c

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2016, 07:37:41 PM »
I find Nottingham attenuates slightly higher then O5 for higher gravity beers.
I've done 11% DIPA with a big enough pitch of Nottingham.
Some of the English ale yeasts will do the job as well if you want a bit more flavour from your yeast.
 

Leann ull

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2016, 10:22:49 PM »
No problem using Irish Ale used several times for high gravity barrel RIS Porters etc, strap it down though :D
 Technique, big starter as otherwise it'll drown and stress in all the fermentables, so if you normally do 1L for a 1050 2l for a 1000-1100 etc

cruiscinlan

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2016, 10:25:15 PM »
Some of the English ale yeasts will do the job as well if you want a bit more flavour from your yeast.

Any suggestions on an a strain? I don't find the attenuation % or style lists on the White Labs or Wyeast sites much use, as they all seem to say that each yeast or at least very many will do the same job.

Another suggestion I've seen is to make a plain ale or bitter first and then to pitch your high gravity wort on top of that.

nigel_c

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2016, 10:31:04 PM »
Wlp013 will do the job for an English or 004 Irish ale as John has suggested.
A session stout is a great way to get a big RIS going. It's just keeps on going when you rack onto it but you risk over pitching. I've don't his method with big beers but have dumped about 1/2 of the yeast cake. There'll be more then enough healthy yeast in what's left.

Leann ull

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2016, 12:13:13 AM »
Also I don't use yeast after its done a work out on big beers.

oblivious

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2016, 08:26:38 AM »
Gervin dry yeast can be handy to for big English style beers

Bubbles

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2016, 10:53:08 AM »
I find Nottingham attenuates slightly higher then O5 for higher gravity beers.
I've done 11% DIPA with a big enough pitch of Nottingham.
Some of the English ale yeasts will do the job as well if you want a bit more flavour from your yeast.

+1

Notty is a great choice for high-gravity beers like RIS. Two sachets will provide you with ample cells to do the job, and is relatively hassle-free. Though these days, I prefer to repitch a yeast cake when doing big beers, as I think it gives a cleaner result.

cruiscinlan

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Re: Yeast strains for high gravity wort (RIS/Stock Ales)
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2016, 08:00:30 PM »
Wlp013 will do the job for an English or 004 Irish ale as John has suggested.
A session stout is a great way to get a big RIS going. It's just keeps on going when you rack onto it but you risk over pitching. I've don't his method with big beers but have dumped about 1/2 of the yeast cake. There'll be more then enough healthy yeast in what's left.

That's a great suggestion alright.  I didn't think there was such a thing as overpitching with a big beer so I'll look out for that.